Author Archives: Bill Chaisson

The Beautiful Healer

The flowers of the butterfly weed fairly leap out at you this time of the year. This unobtrusive relative of the milkweed is practically invisible until it blooms. The plant is smaller than milkweed with more narrow leaves, but the … Continue reading

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A Viburnum With Some Teeth

I’ve been bicycling to work on paths that are often separated from the road by a vegetated buffer that is 20 or 30 feet wide. Over the past three weeks I have noticed a flowering shrub with white corymbs and … Continue reading

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Silvery Russian Autumn

I remember “Russian olive” and “autumn olive” being used interchangeably when I was a kid, planting these exotic shrubs in our yard after purchasing them from the Department of Environmental Conservation in New York. Back in the 1970s the DEC … Continue reading

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Waxy Bells of the Laurels

Somehow I have missed the parade of Vaccinium blooms until now. They and the closely-related Gaylussacia are ericads (laurels) that flower before and during leaf out in late April and into early May, while the larger laurels bloom later in … Continue reading

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Fern That Drops Its “R”s

What exactly does the “Boston” fern have to do with The Hub? (And does anyone call Boston ‘the hub’ anymore?) Nephrolepis exaltata is a subtropical plant, occurring naturally as far north as south Florida and throughout the West Indies, Mexico, Central and South … Continue reading

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The Underwater Meadow

Eelgrass (Zostera marina on the U.S. east coast) is a flowering plant that grows submerged in salt water. In other words, it is not a “seaweed,” which are macrophytic algae. Eelgrass is descended from land plant that found a new … Continue reading

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The Tender Heath

The climate of Martha’s Vineyard is mild and moist. The mildness is reflected in its assignment to USDA Hardiness Zone 7a, which means that temperatures do not descend below 0 to 5 degrees F in the winter. This is the … Continue reading

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